Posts Tagged ‘ River North Fiction ’

We are Thankful…And so are our Authors!

Hello Fiction Fans!
Thanksgiving is just around the corner and we here at River North were just thinking about all the things we are thankful for. We thought it would be fun to ask a few of our authors what they are thankful for and this is what they said:

Captive Trail author Susan page Davis:

I’m very thankful for my family. Jim and I hope to spend this Thanksgiving with four of our six children and five of our eight grandchildren. Maybe in a future year we can get all of them together! Time spent with loved ones is perhaps the blessing I cherish most. 

Long Trail Home author Vickie McDonough:

I’m thankful for a happy, healthy family and that my husband is working full-time again. Over the past three years, he has been laid off four times, including right before Christmas last year. Also, our #3 son just returned from a year’s deployment in Egypt and will get to share the holidays with us this year. 

Pearl in the Sand author Tessa Afshar:

After losing power for a week due to twelve inches of unprecedented snow in October, I have been thanking God more than ever for the small things – for a hug from a friend, for sharing laughter with family, for my quiet times with God, for my hot water bottle. And definitely for my hair dryer!

Lone Star Trail author Darlene Franklin:

I am thankful for a faithful God who never changes, for friends and family, for the opportunity to do what I love most in the world–write.

Faith Deployed…Again author Jocelyn Green:

Other than my precious family, which goes without saying, I’m thankful for the sacrifices military families make for the rest of us, and for the freedom we still have in this country to boldly proclaim the Lordship of Jesus Christ. I was just on the Gary Chapman radio program for Veteran’s Day and I don’t take for granted the blessing it is to be able to speak truth through mass media without fear of repercussions.

What are you thankful for this year? We would love to hear about it! 

 ~Brittany

 

Interview with Christy award winning author—Chris Fabry

Interview with Christy award-winning author—Chris Fabry

Chris Fabry is the winner of multiple Christy awards, has his own daily radio show, and is the author of adult and children’s titles alike. And now he has teamed up with Gary Chapman, the New York Times Bestselling Author, to write A Marriage Carol. Sure to become a Christmas favorite, this Dickensian tale will take you on a journey of discovery where snow has the power to illuminate choices and it’s never too late to get a second chance.

Chris shares his writing life journey including what has led him to write this story so check it out!

 

Buy this perfect Christmas gift at your local Christian bookstore or one of our participating vendors:

Amazon, CBD (Christian Book Distributors), and Family Bookstores.

For more information on the Author’s radio shows and other titles go to Chris Fabry’s or Gary Chapman’s websites.

The radio broadcast of A Marriage Carol was just completed last week and is still in production. It should be airing on Moody Radio around the holidays. Stay tuned for dates and times!

5 Terrific Things for Tuesday: Must Dos for Fall

Good afternoon Fiction Friends!

Our post is all about fall today! What are some things that are nonnegotiable for you when this cool season rolls in after summer? We asked around the office and came up with the top 5. Drumroll please………

1) Apple picking for fresh homemade apple sauce made the Italian way with plenty of butter and saffron.

2) Switching out your summer and spring clothes in your closet for your fall and winter pieces. Make sure and organize them by shirts, jackets, sweaters, pants, and skirts, then you can just grab things and put an outfit together, no shuffling through the closet.

3) Stepping on every crunchy leaf you can find and sipping a pumpkin spice latte while you do it.

4) Going to a pumpkin patch that has everything, and I mean everything. I want a wagon to carry my pumpkin that I choose, I want pumpkin spiced donuts, I want a corn maze with scarecrows, and I want a petting zoo where I can feed the animals. You aren’t supposed to feed the animals in the city. Take me out to the country where I can feed the animals.

5) Boots, boots, and more boots. I love seeing all of the different styles of boots that come out when fall starts. There are brown ones, black ones, grey ones, purple ones, Cowboy boots, tall boots, short boots. I love boots and the different ways you can wear them.  Boots scream fall to me.

What do you absolutely have to do when fall starts?

~Brittany

P.S. Don’t forget the scary short story contest that is going on right now. There is still time to submit a story.

Scary Story Contest: Get Published Here!

Hello Fiction Fans and Writers!

We are smack dab in the middle of time of year where the leaves are changing and falling, the weather is getting crisper, and we are all looking for where we stored our fall jackets. When I think of fall I think of a great warm drink, candy corn, and scary stories being told around a warm fire. River North is looking for the best scary short story you have. Keep in mind that the audience is Christian women and we are looking for about 2500 words.

Submit your story* to rivernorthfiction@moody.edu before noon on October 25th and we will announce the winner on the 27th. The winner will have their story published on the blog and we will promote it on our social media sites. If you are not already following us on twitter or facebook check out our Connect Tab and get started. The winner will also receive a very valuable Dunkin Donuts gift card so they can grab some cider donuts and a pumpkin spiced beverage. Good luck, we look forward to reading your stories!

*in submitting your story you are agreeing to let River North Fiction use your story and publish it in any capacity we deem appropriate.

Stay warm,

Brittany

5 Terrific Things for Tuesday: What is your Fall Beverage of Choice?

Hello Fiction Fans!

I got our team together to discuss a very important topic: What do you have to be sipping on while you are settled in and reading your book?

1) Holly said her favorite beverage in the fall is mulled cider and it must have whipped cream on top, that is not negotiable.

2) Tracey enjoys a hot pumpkin spice chai when she is curled up with her book (she has given up coffee for the month).

3) Michele likes a good ‘ole Diet Coke and prefers it in a pumpkin mug, you know, for the season!

4) Deb digs an Earl Grey tea with a soy topper and two natural sugars, whew, that is a mouthful, and I bet it is delicious!

5) Myself, I prefer a skim latte, plain and simple. I love it when they can make it rich and creamy enough that it tastes like they used whole milk!

What is your preferred fall beverage to curl up with when you are reading? We would love to know!

Happy beautiful leaf changing day, folks!

~Brittany

5 Terrific Things for Tuesday: 5 Ideas for Better Stories

5 Ideas for Better Stories

Today I would like to share the wisdom of others, from some of my favorite books on the craft and life of writing. Unfortunately in my dash to leave home this morning I forgot some of my resources on the granite countertop next to my fridge—a happy accident in hindsight. I will have more to share with you next time.

 From Bird by Bird – by Anne Lamott

1) The ABDCE of Writing

I heard Alice Adams give a lecture . . . . She uses a formula when writing a short story, which goes ABDCE, for Action, Background, Development, Climax, and Ending. You begin with action that is compelling enough to draw us in, make us want to know more. Background is where you let us see and know who these people are, how they’ve come to be together, what was going on before the opening of the story. Then you develop these people, so that we learn what they care most about. The plot—the drama, the actions, the tension—will grow out of that. You move them along until everything comes together in the climax, after which things are different for the main character, different in some real way. And then there is the ending: what is our sense of who these people are now, what are they left with, what happened, and what did it mean?

2) Know Your Characters

Find out what each character cares most about in the world because then you will have discovered what’s at stake. Find a way to express this discovery in action, then let your people set about finding or holding onto or defending whatever it is. They you can take them from good to bad and back again, or from bad to good or from lost to found. But something must be at stake or you will not have tension and your readers will not turn the pages. Think of a hockey player—there had better be a puck out there on the ice, or he is going to look pretty ridiculous.

From Writing for the Soul by Jerry B. Jenkins

3) Point of View is a Party

Imagine your story as a party with you as host. You’ve invited old friends, new friends, neighbors, and acquaintances. Your job is to choreograph the events so people feel comfortable and never wonder what’s going on.

You greet guests at the door and introduce them to each other, get conversations started. Without being intrusive, your aim is to make sure everyone has a good time.

We’ve all been to parties where the host has not covered the basics. Although we don’t expect our host to be the center of attention, we expect her to manage the details. When this is done right, we hardly notice. We simply know we’ve had a good time. When details are neglected, everyone leaves with a bad taste.

Picture yourself as the host of a fiction party. Invite readers to a treat. Don’t take center stage, but manage the basics in such a way that the reader barely notices. Nothing should jar her as she engages with your characters and plot.

No one should notice that you followed the rules of perspective, that you limited your point of view to one character per scene. But they’ll notice if you don’t.

4) Internal Dialogue

Getting inside a person’s head is fun. Imagine a character thinking, I hate that guy and always have. He ripped me off, stole my wife, and crashed my car.

Now put him in a scene with his nemesis and have him say, “Good to see you again, Phil. I’m looking forward to working together.” When Phil responds positively, the reader knows someone’s lying. Probably both of them. Continue that way throughout your story, and the reader will wonder to the end who is being real and who is not.

From Writing Down the Bones – by Natalie Goldberg

5) Be Specific

Be specific. Don’t say “fruit.” Tell what kind of fruit. Give things the dignity of their names. Just as with human beings, it is rude to say, “Hey girl, get in line.” That “girl” has a name. (As a matter of fact, if she’s at least twenty yours old, she’s a woman, not a “girl” at all.) Things too, have names. It is much better to say, “the geranium in the window” than “the flower in the window.” “Geranium”—that one word gives us a much more specific picture. It penetrates more deeply into the beingness of that flower. It immediately gives us the scene by the window—red petals, green circular leaves, all straining toward sunlight.

By Deb Keiser

5 Terrific Things for Tuesday: (We know it is Wednesday!)

5 fantastic books to read now that the kids are back in school

Now that your children are happily situated back at school you will have plenty of time to read! If you do happen to catch a few spare moments here are some suggestions from the fiction fanatics at River North.

Unveiled Freedom – by Jeanette Windle

This believable and timely story is told through 3 characters; Amy a young Christian NGO worker, Jamil a tortured soul and native Afghan, and Steve a cynical independent security contractor. Their lives intersect against the back drop of Afghanistan after the democratic elections and the implementation of Sharia law.  I appreciated the author’s grace-filled approach to Afghan culture and the challenging questions raised about Christian “interference”.  It has been 2-3 months since I finished Unveiled Freedom and I continue to ponder The Great Commission and closed cultures; it is that impactful.

–Holly, Marketing

 The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society–by Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows

Set shortly after the end of WWII main character and author Juliet Ashton receives a letter from one of the book club members on the tiny island of Guernsey. Written in epistolary form, Juliet’s circle of friends on the tiny island grows as they share their enchanting and moving stories of living through the darkness of war. They are all drawn closer together as a community because of one of the inspirational inhabitants of the island. I wanted to catch the next flight to England and meet all the book club members when I finished reading. You too will feel like you have a larger circle of friends. Check out the audio book at your local library, if you can. Lovely to hear all of the voices of the characters—it adds a lot to the telling of the story.

–Deb, Acquisitions 

The Pioneer Woman Cooks-by Ree Drummond

Every once in a while we all find ourselves in a routine for dinners that needs to be broken. This cookbook is the place for inspiration. The Pioneer Woman is a mother of 4 and a rancher’s wife. If she has time to whip up these great recipes, hopefully you can find time too, especially with school having started again. She has a great recipe for pizza with a homemade crust that is whole wheat and simple. She does a little bit of everything from Chicken Fried Steak to Asian Noodles with a very tasty glaze. There are plenty of pictures to draw you in and show you what you are aiming for. She also has plenty of dessert recipes to add to your collection. I have tried a handful of the recipes myself and our household is always satisfied, it is a little down home and a lot of delicious.

–Brittany, Editorial 

Almost Heaven – by Chris Fabry

As I read Almost Heaven, I couldn’t help but be touched deeply by the characters.  I was struck by their ordinary lives and ordinary dreams that God used in very mighty ways if even in a small community.   The tenderness of the main character was evident throughout the book even though he endured significant losses and unexpected turns.  Billy lived his life with the deepest desire to serve God & bring glory to Him in the midst of hardship, disappointment & failures.   I was profoundly moved by the gentleness of his spirit and the way in which God wove a beautiful tapestry out of the brokenness of Billy’s life.  Almost Heaven will encourage you to live your life, however ordinary you think it is, seeing the value in touching people’s lives not gaining wealth or notoriety. It will bring focus to what is important in this life and you will see the greatness of being used by God in ways you might never have expected.  Billy didn’t change the entire world, but God used him to change the lives of those he touched every day.  What more could we ask for?!

–Michele, Sales

Texas Trails Series – by Susan Page Davis, Vickie McDonough, and Darlene Franklin

Finally, we have to recommend a title of our own. Lone Star Trail and Captive Trail are two new releases here that we are so excited about. They are the first two in a series of six and they are sure to get you hooked.

The six-book series about four generations of the Morgan family living, fighting, and thriving amidst a turbulent Texas history spanning from 1845 to 1896 begins with Lone Star Trail.  Judson (Jud) Morgan’s father died for Texas’ freedom during the war for independence.  So when the Society for the Protection of German Immigrants in Texas (the Verein) attempts to colonize a New Germany in his country, he takes a stand against them. After Wande Fleischers’ fiancée marries someone else, the young fraulein determines to make new life for herself in Texas.  With the help of Jud’s sister Marion, Wande learns English and becomes a trusted friend to the entire Morgan family. As much as Jud dislikes the German invasion, he can’t help admiring Wande.  She is sweet and cheerful as she serves the Lord and all those around her.  Can the rancher put aside his prejudice to forge a new future? Through Jud and Wande, we learn the powerful lessons of forgiveness and reconciliation among a diverse community of believers.

Captive Trail is second in a six-book series about four generations of the Morgan family living, fighting, and thriving amidst a turbulent Texas history spanning from 1845 to 1896.  Although a series, each book can be read on its own. Taabe Waipu has run away from her Comanche village and is fleeing south in Texas on a horse she stole from a dowry left outside her family’s teepee.  The horse has an accident and she is left on foot, injured and exhausted.  She staggers onto a road near Fort Chadbourne and collapses. On one of the first runs through Texas, Butterfield Overland Mail Company driver Ned Bright carries two Ursuline nuns returning to their mission station.  They come across a woman who is nearly dead from exposure and dehydration and take her to the mission. With some detective work, Ned discovers Taabe Waipu identity. He plans to unite her with her family, but the Comanche have other ideas, and the two end up defending the mission station. Through Taabe and Ned we learn the true meaning of healing and restoration amid seemingly powerless situations.

We hope you find these suggestions helpful!

~Your fiction team!